LEILA ABOUZEID PDF

Almost every radio broadcast was done in French because the radio was a business, and French was used in business. As part of her program, she translated movie scripts into Arabic and did dramatic readings. One of these was the famous autobiography of Malcolm X. She translated this script into Arabic and read it theatrically over the air. Speaking Arabic, English and French, Abouzeid still uses primarily Arabic because she does not want to conform to the foreign culture that has taken over her country. She does not want to stand for a culture that she is not a part of.

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Almost every radio broadcast was done in French because the radio was a business, and French was used in business. As part of her program, she translated movie scripts into Arabic and did dramatic readings. One of these was the famous autobiography of Malcolm X. She translated this script into Arabic and read it theatrically over the air. Speaking Arabic, English and French, Abouzeid still uses primarily Arabic because she does not want to conform to the foreign culture that has taken over her country.

She does not want to stand for a culture that she is not a part of. To Leila, the use of the French language is being submissive to invaders that are not even present anymore.

In The Last Chapter, Abouzeid explains her opinion on the use of French in her school years in her closing chapter called Afterword: by the author: "I was in a private school in Rabat where Arabic and French were the languages of instruction. I loathed reading in French and developed an aversion to using it outside the classroom. This early position against the language of the colonialist proved fortunate, as it kept me from becoming one of the post-colonial Maghrebi [North African] writers producing a national literature in a foreign language.

Leila expresses her contempt for the French and their language several times, and even while she was young and in school she hated French. Again in the novel she mentions her hatred for French schooling, "I feel bad for mademoiselle Doze, even if she was French" Abouzeid, 6. Leila also has personal reasons to hate the French. The French had arrested and tortured her father for being, and had forced the language upon her. This made her hate the French from a very young age.

She does not show any hate for other foreign languages like the English language because they have not personally caused harm to her. Year of the Elephant[ edit ] Her first book called Year of the Elephant was published in , and was published in English in by Texas University. Her book was translated into French only in Year of the Elephant was named after a battle in Islamic history. The story of the battle is that during an early religious based battle, a flock of birds came and dropped stones on the enemy elephants, causing them to turn around.

She compares this historic battle to the Moroccans battling for independence because they are mere birds compared to the gigantic global power of their French rulers. Out of those two, only Aisha graduated. The misogyny present in real life Morocco is mirrored through this book. In Morocco, women are not very well educated, and something like two women in a class was typical and accepted. Leila did very well in school because of the brain she was not expected to have.

Men assumed women were born with no intelligence which is contradicted by scientific evidence , but it is assumed this is because their education was stifled by the patriarchal government. In a study in , literacy rates in Morocco were recorded at In other words, women are barely educated, and a majority of them cannot even read, while most men are literate. Topic of identity in work[ edit ] Her work touches upon the identity of people, and the nature of the possession of it or lack thereof.

In the beginning of The Year of the Elephant, the main character is wandering the streets after a devastating divorce. As she barely holds onto the will to live she states, "I feel nothing. Have I lost my own identity? Her divorce has taken away her personality and sense of self entirely.

Abouzeid describes her as just a body showing up for class, not Doze Abouzeid 6. All soul that was left in her body had seemingly left, and the teacher barely existed. Aisha examines how this sudden change happened, and questions: "Can you lose your identity like you use an identification card?

Does some unseen part of the machinery snap, suddenly and irreparably" Abouzeid, pg.

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LEILA ABOUZEID YEAR OF THE ELEPHANT PDF

Born in , Leila Abouzeid was only six years old when Morocco achieved national independence. Year of the Elephant is largely an auto-biographical novel. The novel opens with the return of Zahra, the narrator and central character, to her hometown after a divorce that has left her destitute and without realistic legal options: He had simply sat down and said, "Your papers will be sent to you along with whatever the law provides. How worthless a woman is if she can be returned with a paper receipt like some store-bought object!

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Leila Abouzeid

Barr How worthless a woman is thw she can be returned with a paper receipt like some store-bought object! I loathed reading in French and developed an aversion to using it outside the classroom. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? Leila also has personal reasons to hate the French. Speaking Arabic, English and French, Abouzeid still uses primarily Arabic because she does not want to conform to the foreign culture that has taken over her country. List of writers Women writers Moroccan literature Arabic Tamazight. Leila Abouzeid — Wikipedia This is a strong three, not wishy-washy three, and might be four if I reread it as a good, attentive reader.

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Libri di Leila Abouzeid

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